I WAS A TEENAGE TAX CONSULTANT

Creators: John Wagner & Ian Gibson
10 episodes: 1997

This story was scripted in 1991, six years before it would see print. Our hero is biker Jimmy Root, who is bitten on the ankle by a mad accountant and undergoes a transformation into a figures-obsessed, calculator-stealing finance consultant. Often hilarious, this one is certainly a contender for the most bizarre series to ever see print. The copious amount of nudity in the early episodes is a little unexpected.

I Was a Teenage Tax Consultant, 10 episodes [60 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1050-1059 (July to Sept. 1997). Story by John Wagner, art by Ian Gibson.

INABA

Creators: Robbie Morrison & Frank Quitely
3 episodes: 1996, 1998

Judge-Inspector Inaba is a supporting character in Shimura. She has made a pair of solo appearances as well.

Reprinted? The three episodes of this series were reprinted in the 2004 DC/Rebellion Shimura collection.

Babes with Big Bazookas, 1 episode [9 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol. 3 #21 (Sep. 1996). Story by Robbie Morrison, art by Frank Quitely.

Big Lix and Flying Kicks, 2 episodes [12 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #37-38 (Jan. to Feb. 1998). Story by Robbie Morrison, art by Teague/Dini/Roach.

Inaba also appeared in "Warriors," a three-part Dredd story originally intended for the cancelled Lawman of the Future comic, which saw print in Megazine vol.3 #31-33, along with several episodes of Shimura.

INDIGO PRIME

Creators: John Smith & Chris Weston
27 episodes: 1986, 1989-91

The execution of Indigo Prime revealed a mini-universe in 2000 AD which wormed its way through several short stories, one-shots and another John Smith-scripted series, Tyranny Rex. For ease of reference, all of the non-Tyranny episodes are grouped together here as Indigo Prime, the name under which a few of them appeared. Indigo Prime is an organization which works to protect reality from incursions outside our understanding, but is also willing to manipulate time and space in the services of very rich clients. Its agents, under the jurisdiction of Major Arcana, tend to be almost shockingly amoral, but those characters which we do meet are incredibly interesting eccentrics, and the constant feel that there is so much more we could know is one reason the strip evokes such strong memories in its fans.

The first Indigo Prime agents we meet are Basalt and Foundation, in the 1986 Future Shock "A Change of Scenery," where the operation was called Void Indiga (TM). This operation is seen again briefly in "Woody Allen," a Tyranny Rex story from the 1988 Sci-Fi Special which introduces Major Arcana. Two disgraced former agents named Fervent and Lobe were introduced in another Tyranny story called "Soft Bodies." These two psychic cowboys got their own series, "The Issigri Variations," in 1989, which also features Major Arcana and the originally-introduced Basalt and Foundation, along with Lobe's former girlfriend Almaranda, an overweight fortune teller. Five additional episodes, with splendid art by Chris Weston, appeared under the Indigo Prime logo (used for the first time) in 1990 and fleshed out the grand concept, introducing us, at least briefly, to four other agents. (Some others make very curious cameo appearances.) After that, there was an Almaranda two-parter, and then there was the blood and thunder of "Killing Time," easily one of the wildest things to ever appear in 2000 AD. This was a truly shocking ten-part story in which agents Max Winwood and Ishmael Cord allow Jack the Ripper to complete his last murder in order for them to battle the Iscariot, a creature outside time and space who was using the Ripper to ensure its own freedom. Smith's scripting on this beast is a masterwork of horror - each episode builds upon the previous with some absolutely stunning moments and horrendous imagery. 2000 AD should always be dangerous and unconventional - it's what makes it better than any other comic - but heroes in adventure series just don't meet the sort of fate which awaits Winwood and Cord and the supporting characters.

The cruelty of "Killing Time" was followed by a worse fate for its readers: after spending five years building up and finally letting rip on a fantastic storyline like that, Smith says he became bored of the concept and dropped it. For years, Tharg featured color pinups of Winwood and Cord (Weston must have prepped dozens as possible front covers in 1991), but the incredible tapestry and background of Indigo Prime has been sadly abandoned. The tragedy is that any number of tired old "thrills" like Slaine or Rogue Trooper can limp back to 2000 AD for yet another pointless rehash, but one of the most unique and truly thrilling strips to ever appear in 2000 AD rests in comparative peace.

On the other hand, all times and places are relative to Indigo Prime; they could end up returning for a 13-week run when nobody suspects.

Trivia: Smith elected to change the organization's orginal name, Void Indiga (TM), after noting the similarly-coined Void Indigo, a Marvel graphic novel by Steve Gerber.

Top moment: Episodes nine and ten of "Killing Time" are inarguably amazing, but for sheer "did I just read what I think I did" quality, itís probably the bit in which the previously macho "go ahead and kill me, I don't care" Dr. Culver breaks down and begs screaming for his life. Throne of Blood, The Godfather, The Wicker Man - thereís never been a death scene as amazing as that.

Reprinted? Hamlyn collected "Killing Time" in 1993, but it's long out of print. An almost complete collection was released by DC/Rebellion in June 2005.

A Change of Scenery, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 490 (Oct. 1986). Story by John Smith, art by Nik Williams.

Fervent & Lobe: The Issigri Variations, 8 episodes [33 pgs], 2000 AD progs 642-649 (Sept. to Oct. 1989). Story by "The Grim Brothers" (Smith), art by Mike Hadley.

Indigo Prime, 1 episode [7 pgs], 2000 AD prog 678 (May 1990). Story by Smith, art by Chris Weston.

Winwood & Cord: Downtime, 2 episodes [10 pgs], 2000 AD progs 680-681 (May 1990). Story by Smith, art by Weston.

Fegredo & Brecht: How the Land Lied, 2 episodes [10 pgs], both in 2000 AD prog 682 (June 1990). Story by Smith, art by Weston.

Fervent & Lobe: Holiday on Ice, 1 episode [10 pgs], 2000 AD Winter Special 3 (Dec. 1990). Story by Smith, art by Mike Hadley.

Almaranda: Solstice, 2 episodes [12 pgs], 2000 AD progs 720-721 (Mar. 1991). Story by Smith, art by Mike Hadley.

Killing Time, 10 episodes [63 pgs], 2000 AD progs 735-744 (June to Aug. 1991). Story by Smith, art by Chris Weston.

DC/REBELLION REPRINTS

The Complete Indigo Prime (7/05). Reprints "The Issigri Variations," "Indigo Prime," "Downtime," "How the Land Lied," "Solstice," "Holiday on Ice" and "Killing Time."

The Best of Tharg's Future Shocks (11/08). Reprints "A Change of Scenery."

INFERNO

Creators: Tom Tully & Massimo Belardinelli
40 episodes: 1977-78

This sequel to Harlem Heroes, featuring several of the same characters in another bizarre "future sport," was even more violent than its predecessor.

Trivia:It was revealed in David Bishop's Thrill-Power Overload investigation into 2000 AD's history that the comic was very nearly cancelled in 1978 over the Inferno episodes in progs 68 and 69. The cliffhanger saw an unconscious Giant doused with rocket fuel from his damaged jet pack and about to be set on fire by their enemy Artie Gruber. IPC management was incensed over the imagery and very nearly shut the comic down. With the trademark infringements to be seen in Judge Dredd over the next few weeks, it was an interesting time in the Command Module...

Reprinted? This series has yet to be reprinted; you'll need the original progs.

Inferno, 40 episodes [183 pgs], 2000 AD progs 36-75 (Oct. 1977 to July 1978). Story by Tom Tully, art by Massimo Belardinelli.

INFINITY INC.

Creators: Chris Lowder & Jesus Redondo
3 episodes: 1983-84

"Kismet" was a one-off Time Twister about a time-travel tourism company. The company returned in a subsequent two-part adventure.

Reprinted? This series has yet to be reprinted; you'll need the original progs.

Kismet, 1 episode [3 pgs], 2000 AD prog 333 (Sep. 1983). Story by "Jack Adrian" (Chris Lowder), art by Robin Smith.

The Great Infinity Inc. Foul-Up, 2 episodes [9? pgs], 2000 AD progs 356-357 (Feb. 1984). Story by "Jack Adrian" (Chris Lowder), art by Jesus Redondo.

INSIDERS

Creators: Mark Millar & Paul Grist
6 episodes: 1991

Reprinted? This series has not yet been reprinted.

Insiders, 6 episodes [? pgs], Crisis # 54-59 (Jan. to June 1991). Story by Mark Millar, art by Paul Grist.

THE INSPECTRE

Creators: Kevin Walker & Jim Campbell
11 episodes: 1996-97

In the days before the Apocalypse War which devastated Judge Dredd's world (2000 AD progs 245-270), War Marshall Kazan had imprisoned his city's psychic judges in a hidden gulag, with "special" treatment reserved for Judge Viktor Zadek, who had attempted to kill the mad marshal. Almost twenty years later, a new city is being built where East-Meg One had once stood, and Zadek's specialties are needed to exorcise the ghosts of the war.

Reprinted? This series has yet to be reprinted; you'll need the original Megs.

Requiem, 3 episodes [24 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #23-25 (Nov. 1996 to Jan. 1997). Story by Kevin Walker & Jim Campbell, art by Walker.

Baptism of Fire, 2 episodes [14 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #26-27 (Feb. to Mar. 1997). Story by Walker & Campbell, art by Charlie Gillespie.

Damn'd Spirits All, 2 episodes [14 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #28-29 (Apr. to May 1997). Story by Walker & Campbell, art by Charlie Gillespie.

Trial By Fury, 4 episodes [28 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #30-33 (June to Sep. 1997). Story by Walker & Campbell, art by Andrew Currie & Del Frost.

INSURRECTION

Creators: Dan Abnett & Colin MacNeil
6 episodes: 2009

.

Reprinted? This series has not yet been reprinted. You'll need the original Megs.

Insurrection, 6 episodes, Judge Dredd Megazine 279-284 (Jan. to May 2009). Story by Dan Abnett, art by Colin MacNeil.

INTERCEPTOR

Creators: Ian Edginton & Steve Pugh
9 episodes: 2003


Interceptor, 9 episodes [45 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1337-1345 (Apr. to June 2003). Story by Ian Edginton, art by Steve Pugh & Len O'Grady.

INVASION!

Creators: Pat Mills & Gerry Finley-Day
55 episodes: 1977-79

Invasion! introduced the Volgans (or Volgs), soldiers of an evil empire (Russians with Nazi-like habits) who would be seen in other series up until the early 1980s. Our hero, lorry driver Bill Savage, reappeared in a prequel series called Disaster 1990 and made a memorable return in the third series of Armoured Gideon. Pat Mills returned to the character in 2004's Savage.

The Resistance, 5 episodes [23 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1-5 (Feb. to March 1977). Story by Pat Mills & Gerry Finley-Day, art by Jesus Blasco (1-3), Pat Wright (4) & Sarompas (5).

Wembley, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 6 (Apr. 1977). Story by Gerry Finley-Day, art by Ian Kennedy.

Train Story, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 7 (Apr. 1977). Story by Pat Mills, art by Sarompas.

Concorde, 1 episode [4 pgs], 2000 AD prog 8 (Apr. 1977). Story by Gerry Finley-Day, art by Mike Dorey.

Ships, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 9 (Apr. 1977). Story by Gerry Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino.

Dartmoor, 2 episodes [7 pgs], 2000 AD progs 10-11 (May 1977). Story by Gerry Finley-Day, art by Eric Bradbury.

Death Line, 1 episode [4 pgs], 2000 AD prog 12 (May 1977). Story by Gerry Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino.

The Doomsdale Scenario, 3 episodes [13 pgs], 2000 AD progs 13-15 (May to June 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Mike Dorey (1 & 3) & Carlos Pino (2).

Bounty Hunter, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 16 (June 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino.

Slaves, 1 episode [4 pgs], 2000 AD prog 17 (June 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Mike Dorey.

Breakout, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 18 (June 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino.

The Road to Hell, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 19 (July 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Mike Dorey.

untitled, 1 episode [? pgs], 1977 2000 AD Summer Special (July 1977). Story and art not credited.

Hell's Angels, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 20 (July 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino.

Sandringham, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 21 (July 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Mike Dorey.

Cheddar Gorge, 1 episode [3 pgs], 2000 AD prog 22 (Aug. 1977). Story by Nick Allen, art by Carlos Pino.

Tyne Tunnel, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 23 (Aug. 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Mike Dorey.

Hadrian's Wall, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 24 (Aug. 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino.

Bathtub, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 25 (Aug. 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Mike Dorey.

Bluebird, 1 episode [4 pgs], 2000 AD prog 26 (Aug. 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino.

Dirty Jocks, 5 episodes [21 pgs], 2000 AD progs 27-31 (Sep. 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Mike Dorey (1), Carlos Pino (2 & 4) & Luis Collado (3 & 5).

Volgess, 2 episodes [9 pgs], 2000 AD progs 32-33 (Oct. 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Mike Dorey.

Collaborator, 1 episode [4 pgs], 2000 AD prog 34 (Oct. 1977). Story by Nick Flynn, art by Luis Collado.

New Recruits, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 35 (Oct. 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino.

Jump Jet, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 36 (Oct. 1977). Story by Chris Lowder, art by Ian Kennedy.

The Prince, 8 episodes [39 pgs], 2000 AD progs 37-44 (Nov. to Dec. 1977). Story by Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino (pts 1,3,5,7) & Mike Dorey (pts 2,4,6,8).

The Return of Rosa, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 45. Story by Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino.

Deadlier Than the Male, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 46 (Jan. 1978). Story by Finley-Day. Art by "J. Clough" (Dorey).

Escape from Liverpool, 5 episodes [26 pgs], 2000 AD progs 47-51. Story by Finley-Day, art by Carlos Pino (pts 1 & 3) & "J. Clough" (Dorey, pts 2, 4-5).

Tank Trap, 1 episode [8 pgs], 1978 2000 AD Annual (Sep. 1977). Story and art not credited.

untitled, 1 episode [6 pgs], 1979 2000 AD Annual (Sep. 1978). Story and art not credited.

untitled, 1 episode [? pgs], 1979 Dan Dare Annual (Sep. 1978). Story and art not credited.

untitled, 1 episode [8 pgs], 1980 2000 AD Annual (Sep. 1979). Story and art not credited.

REBELLION REPRINTS

Invasion! (4/07). Reprints all of the weekly episodes from progs 1-51 along with the untitled story from the 1979 2000 AD annual.

JANUS: PSI DIVISION

Creators: Grant Morrison & Carlos Ezquerra
15 episodes: 1993, 1995-97

Judy Janus was introduced in prog 842. Her debut one-shot introduced several subplots that were never developed. With Judge Anderson off learning about her humanity in the Megazine in the mid-1990s, Janus became her erstwhile replacement in the weekly with several dark and mean-spirited adventures. However, as Anderson returned to duty in the city, sharing space in the Megazine with another female psychic named Karyn, the city seemed choked with psis. Janus was the natural one to drop as Morrison and Millar left the books. The villain Faustus, incidentally, is another dull Millar indestructible man.

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

Will o' the Wisp, 1 episode [? pgs], 2000 AD Winter Special 5 (Nov. 1993). Story by Grant Morrison, art by Carlos Ezquerra.

House of Sighs, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 953 (Aug. 1995). Story by Morrison & Maggie Knight, art by Paul Johnson & Junior Tomlin.

A New Star, 5 episodes [30 pgs], 2000 AD progs 980-984 (Feb. to Mar. 1996). Story by Mark Millar, art by Johnson.

Faustus, 8 episodes [48 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1024-1031. (Jan. to Feb. 1997). Story by Morrison & Millar, art by Johnson.

JOE BLACK

Creators: Kelvin Gosnell & Mike Dorey
6 episodes: 1981-82

Joe was a coffee-drinking agent of PEST - the Planetary Exploration and Survey Trust. He appeared in six Future Shocks but unfortunately never graduated to a full series. His tales are mostly forgotten, which is a shame, as some of them, especially "Horn of Plenty," are quite clever.

Reprinted? Occasional episodes have made their way into some of the American collections as space fillers.

Trial and Error, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 204 (Mar. 1981). Story by Kelvin Gosnell, art by Mike Dorey.

Bloomin' Cold, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 215 (June 1981). Story by Gosnell, art by Garry Leach.

Joe Black's Tall Tale, 1 episode [3 pgs], 2000 AD prog 241 (Dec. 1981). Story by Gosnell, art by John Higgins.

Horn of Plenty, 1 episode [4 pgs], 2000 AD prog 248 (Jan. 1982). Story by Gosnell, art by Higgins.

The Hume Factor, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 252 (Feb. 1982). Story by Gosnell, art by Higgins.

Joe Black's Big Bunco!, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 256 (Mar. 1982). Story by Gosnell, art by Higgins.

JOHNNY WOO

Character created by Gordon Rennie & PJ Holden
3 episodes: 2005

As with Bato Loco and Cursed Earth Koburn, Johnny Woo (aka Hong Tong Judge Inspector Liu Chan Yeun) first appeared as a guest star in one of Rennie's Judge Dredd scripts and graduated, in time, to his own series.

Reprinted? Not as yet.

A Bullet in the Head, 3 episodes [24 pgs], Meg 231-233 (May to June 2005). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by P.J. Holden.

Johnny Woo first appeared in 2000 AD prog 1233 (2001) and next in Meg 209-210 (2003).

THE JOURNAL OF LUKE KIRBY

Creators: Alan McKenzie & John Ridgway
46 episodes: 1988, 1990, 1992-95

Predating The Books of Magic by years, never mind Harry Potter, this story of a young man learning magic benefits from its slow pace, rural setting and gorgeous artwork. There was some question among the editorial staff as to whether the series actually belonged in 2000 AD, which may explain the very long gap between the initial "Summer Magic" adventure, and "The Night Walker" (which was announced, and apparently finished, well over a year before it appeared). More stories were supposedly forthcoming, but, as Alan McKenzie left the comic industry, it looks like Luke's journal will be closed for the forseeable future.

Top moment: On holiday with his family, Luke's cousin Kim asks him to tell her fortune, hoping for a large house and family. Luke instead sees her grisly death in a traffic accident.

Reprinted? "The Night Walker" was reprinted as a three-issue American miniseries.

Summer Magic, 7 episodes [36 pgs], 2000 AD progs 571-577 (Apr. to June 1988). Story by Alan McKenzie, art by John Ridgway.

A Winter's Tale, 1 episode [? pgs], 2000 AD Winter Special 1 (Dec. 1988). Story by Alan McKenzie, art by Graham Higgins.

The Dark Path, 1 episode [? pgs], 1990 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special (Jul. 1990). Story by Alan McKenzie, art by John Ridgway & Tim Perkins.

The Night Walker, 13 episodes [79 pgs], 2000 AD progs 800-812 (Sep. to Nov. 1992). Story by Alan McKenzie, art by John Ridgway.

Sympathy for the Devil prologue, 2 episodes [12 pgs], 2000 AD progs 850-851 (Aug. to Sep. 1993). Story by McKenzie, art by Ridgway.

Trick or Treat, 1 episode [8 pgs], 1994 2000 AD Yearbook (Sep. 1993). Story by McKenzie, art by Ridgway.

Sympathy for the Devil, 10 episodes [60 pgs], 2000 AD progs 873-877 and 884-888 (Apr. to June 1994). Story by McKenzie, art by Steve Parkhouse, Nick Abadzis & Gina Hart.

The Old Straight Track, 10 episodes [60 pgs], progs 954-963 (Aug. to Oct. 1995). Story by McKenzie, art by Parkhouse.

The Price, 1 episode [8 pgs], prog 972 (Dec. 1995). Story by McKenzie, art by John Ridgway & Tim Perkins.

JUDGE DEATH

Character created by John Wagner & Brian Bolland
28 episodes: 1990-92, 2002-2004

Judge Death is a monster from a parallel dimension where the ruling judges decided that, as all crimes were committed by the living, life itself would be criminalized. After wiping out the entire population of his planet, Death visited Mega-City One in progs 149-151. A little more than a year later, he returned in the five-part "Judge Death Lives," wherein it is revealed, in possibly comics' greatest cliffhanger, that there are actually four Dark Judges - Fear, Fire and Mortis have come to our world to free him.

The Dark Judges appeared twice more to plague the Mega-City, but while Fear, Fire and Mortis are captured after the events of "Necropolis," Death remained at large, and was revealed in "Young Death," one of the series which launched The Judge Dredd Megazine, to be hiding out as a tenant in Mrs. Gundersonís flat. It was this story, and his periodic appearances afterward, which began to treat the character less as a real threat and more as an over-the-top comic creation; previously the absurdity of the concept had been played straight, despite an almost Marvel Comics-styled "arch-enemy" antagonism with Psi-Judge Anderson. This reached a nadir when Judge Death appeared in the first of four Batman / Dredd crossovers, "Judgement on Gotham," attacking a crowd at a heavy metal concert while singing his own take on the Stones' "Sympathy for the Devil."

Although captured in this story, Death continued to make goofy cameos for years afterward, before making another bid for freedom in the fourth of the Batman crossovers, "Die Laughing." Mercifully, this was the last of the stupid "comedy" Judge Death stories. Most recently, he was broken out again and was seen in a six-parter in the weekly. Attempting to kill Anderson and believing himself successful, Death left Mega-City One to bring his brand of vengeance to the muties and outlaws of the Cursed Earth. While this was a welcome return to form and the first good Judge Death story in over a decade, we can't help but wish Death would remain out there for a very long time before returning to battle Dredd and Anderson; the character has just appeared far too frequently, and has lost virtually all of his impact through overuse.

Reprinted? "Boyhood of a Superfiend" was collected by Hamlyn in the early 1990s, and by Fleetway in a four-part miniseries after the cancellation of the American-sized Megazine. Titan, Hamlyn and DC have also collected many of the important Dredd/Anderson episodes with the character. Rebellion collected the two Wagner/Irving stories.

Boyhood of a Superfiend, 12 episodes [79 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.1 #1-12 (Sep. 1990 to Aug. 1991). Story by "Brian Skuter" (John Wagner), art by Peter Doherty.

The Masque of the Judge Death, 1 episode [10 pgs], 1991 Judge Dredd Mega Special #4 (July 1991). Story by Si Spencer, art by John McCrea.

Tea With Mrs. Gunderson, 1 episode [8 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #15 (Oct. 1992). Story by John Wagner, art by Dean Ormston.

My Name is Death, 6 episodes [36 pgs], progs 1289-1294 (May to June 2002). Story by John Wagner, art by Frazer Irving.

The Wilderness Days, 8 episodes [64 pgs], Meg 209-216 (Aug 2003 to Jan. 2004). Story by John Wagner, art by Frazer Irving.

Judge Death has also appeared in a number of Dredd and Anderson episodes, as well as the Batman/Judge Dredd books "Judgement in Gotham" and "Die Laughing." See progs 149-151, 224-228, 416-427, 612-613, 672-701, 733-735, 901-902, 1000-1006 and 1114-1115.

REBELLION REPRINTS

My Name is Death (12/05). Reprints "My Name is Death" and "The Wilderness Days."

Boyhood of a Superfiend (5/08). Reprints "Boyhood of a Superfiend" and "The Masque of the Judge Death."

JUDGE HERSHEY

Character created by John Wagner & Brian Bolland
28 episodes: 1989, 1992-93, 1995-97

Hershey has been one of the longest-running supporting members of the Judge Dredd universe. She was introduced in "The Judge Child" in 1981 and has regularly appeared as one of Dredd's staunchest allies, frequently turning to him for advice. In the Megazine, she appeared in a recurring solo series under the auspices of a number of writers, her cases generally dealing with city corruption and human issues (she was shown in "The Harlequin's Dance" to have a young nephew), and not the bizarre future crimes often seen in Dredd's series. Following 1999's "Doomsday Scenario" Dredd epic, Hershey became Chief Judge of Mega-City One.

Reprinted? Very few of the Hershey solo stories have been reprinted, only "A Game of Dolls," in 2000 AD Extreme Edition # 22.

True Brit, 1 episode [5 pgs], Judge Dredd Mega Special #2 (June 1989). Story by Alan Grant, art by Doug Braithwaite & Elliot.

Down Time, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2, #9 (Aug. 1992). Story by Dave Stone, art by Paul Peart.

The Not-So Merry Wives of Windsor, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #12 (Oct. 1992). Story by Robbie Morrison, art by "Xuasus."

Deathsquads, 4 episodes [30 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #14-17 (Oct. to Dec. 1992). Story by Peter Cornwall, art by Yan Shimony.

Asylum, 2 episodes [14 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #25-26 (Apr. 1993). Story by Robbie Morrison, art by "Siku" (Ajibayo Akinsiku).

A Game of Dolls, 4 episodes [28 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #27-30 (May to June 1993). Story by Igor Goldkind, art by Kevin Cullen.

Hov-bus Blues, 1 episode [? pgs], 1993 Judge Dredd Mega Special #6 (June 1993). Story by Robbie Morrison, art by Darren Stephens.

Degenomancer, 2 episodes [16 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #35-36 (Aug. to Sep. 1993). Story by Dave Stone, art by Charlie Adlard.

The Harlequin's Dance, 4 episodes [30 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #37-40 (Sep. to Nov. 1993). Story by Igor Goldkind, art by Kevin Cullen.

Naked and Unashamed, 1 episode [? pgs], 1994 Judge Dredd Yearbook (Sep. 1993). Story by Robbie Morrison, art by Paul Peart.

Spider in the Web, 2 episodes [17 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #9-10 (Nov. 1995). Story and art by Paul Neal & Marc Wigmore (with Dondie Cox).

Barbara, 1 episode [8 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #11 (Dec. 1995). Story and art by Paul Neal & Marc Wigmore (with Dondie Cox).

The Enemy, 2 episodes [12 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #12-13 (Dec. 1995). Story and art by Paul Neal & Marc Wigmore (with Dondie Cox).

Sacrifices, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #18 (June 1996). Story and art by Paul Neal & Marc Wigmore.

I Don't Believe in Love, 1 episode [8 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #28 (Apr. 1997). Story and art by Marc Wigmore.

In addition, Hershey has appeared in dozens of Dredd episodes. See, among others, progs 156-181, 193-196, 263-266, 270, 300-303, 335-341, 393-406, 457, 623-625, 743-745, 761, 804-807, 829, 842-853, 915-918 and 1153-1164. Since prog 1167, she has been Chief Judge of Mega-City One.

JULIET NOVEMBER

Character created by Alan Grant & Arthur Ranson
3 episodes: 2003

Juliet November is a freelance pyrokinetic in Mega-City One, introduced in prog 1189. She got a short series of her own in 2003.

Reprinted? Not yet, but there again, the character's hasn't had many pages to her name yet.

Phoenix Falling, 3 episodes [24 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine 202-204 (Feb. to Apr. 2003). Story by Alan Grant, art by Graham Manley.

Juliet November first appeared in prog 1189 (2000) and returned in Anderson: "Lock-In" in Meg 227-230 (2005).

JUNKER

Creators: Michael Fleisher & John Ridgway
16 episodes: 1990-91

The least offensive of Fleisher's contributions, but only by comparison, this one is still very predictable, sexist and dated. Our hero is one of those "dese, dem, dose" he-man wumman haters that populate too much trash American fiction. Ridgway's artwork isn't up to his usual standards. The space shots look beautiful and are colored well by Perkins, but there are plenty of panels that include just the heads of the talking characters, without bodies or backgrounds.

Reprinted? Surprisingly, yes. This was reprinted across four issues of 2000 AD Showcase in America.

Junker, 16 episodes [95 pgs], progs 708-716 and 724-730 (Dec. 1990 to May 1991). Story by Michael Fleisher, art by John Ridgway & Tim Perkins.


Continue to part nine...
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