M A C H ONE

Creators: Pat Mills & John Wagner
64 episodes: 1977-79

MACH One was, of course, the first man to be *successfully* activated by Compu-Puncture Hyper-Power. In other words, he was a big ole Steve Austin rip-off. The "Bionic action stickers" presented with prog 2, and laughed about in the letters page ever since, were meant to promote this series.

As much as "modern" eyes may scoff at this silly spy series for under-twelves, MACH One was tremendously successful at the time, and a rereading reveals some unexpected twists and surprises, including a rather breathless degree of violence. It took Judge Dredd a little while to find an audience; until it did, this was 2000 AD's Top Thrill.

Reprinted? 2000 AD Extreme Edition #6 (12/04) reprinted 9 of the first 10 episodes (all but #3), along with "Airship," "The Planet Killers," "Everest" and "MACH Woman." 19 episodes in one handy package, with a great cover by John Burns. A second batch of 20 episodes were reprinted in Extreme Edition #9 (6/05). These included "UFO" and the final 16 installments. Many other episodes had previously been collected by Quality Comics in a series that ran nine issues.

Vulcan, 2 episodes [11 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1-2 (Feb. 1977). Story by Pat Mills, art by Enio & Ian Kennedy.

Battleship, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 3 (Mar. 1977). Story by Nick Allen, art by Massimo Belardinelli.

To Kill a President, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 4 (Mar. 1977). Story by Pat Mills, art by Enio.

Probe Snatch, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 5 (Mar. 1977). Story by Nick Allen, art by John Cooper.

Himmler's Gold, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 6 (Apr. 1977). Story by Pat Mills, art by Mike Dorey.

Bolivia, 1 episode [7 pgs], 2000 AD prog 7 (Apr. 1977). Story by Pat Mills, art by Enio.

Spain Kidnap, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 8 (Apr. 1977). Story by Nick Allen, art by John Cooper.

Our Man in Turkostan, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 9 (Apr. 1977). Story by John Wagner, art by John Cooper.

On the Roof of the World, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 10 (Apr. 1977). Story by Pat Mills, art by Enio.

Operation Death-Drive!, 1 episode [7 pgs], 2000 AD prog 11 (May 1977). Story by Roy Preston, art by Barry Mitchell.

Laser Tank, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 12 (May 1977). Story by Charles Herring, art by Mike Dorey.

Airship, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 13 (May 1977). Story by Nick Allen, art by Jesus Redondo.

Chinese Formula, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 14 (May 1977). Story by Steve MacManus, art by Kato.

Yeti, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 15 (June 1977). Story by Peter Harris, art by Marzal Canos.

Capitol, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 16 (June 1977). Story by John Wagner, art by P. Martinez Henares.

Spotbox, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 17 (June 1977). Story by Nick Allen, art by Jesus Redondo.

Skyscraper Terrorists, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 18 (June 1977). Story by Nick Allen, art by Marzal Canos.

Barbed Wire (aka "Corporal Tanaka"), 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 19 (July 1977). Story by Robert Flynn, art by Luis Callado.

untitled, 1 episode [8 pgs], 1977 2000 AD Summer Special (July 1977). Story and art uncredited.

Tokyo, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 20 (July 1977). Story by Steve MacManus, art by Jose Ortiz.

Recluse, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 21 (July 1977). Story by Nick Allen.

Arab Story, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 22 (July 1977). Story by Nick Allen, art by John Cooper.

Spy Plane, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 23 (July 1977). Story by Robert Flynn, art by Massimo Belardinelli.

King Karat, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 24 (Aug. 1977). Story by Roy Preston, art by Massimo Belardinelli.

Terror Train, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 25 (Aug. 1977). Story by Nick Allen, art by Pierre Frisano.

Balls of the Gods, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 26 (Aug. 1977). Story by Steve MacManus, art by Marzal Canos.

The Planet Killers, 3 episodes [19 pgs], 2000 AD progs 27-29 (Aug. to Sep. 1977). Story by Pat Mills, art by Jesus Redondo.

untitled, 1 episode [5 pgs], 1978 2000 AD Annual (Sep. 1977). Story and art uncredited.

Operation Hercules, 1 episode [7 pgs], 1978 2000 AD Annual (Sep. 1977). Story and art uncredited.

UFO, 4 episodes [22 pgs], 2000 AD progs 30-33 (Sep. 1977). Story by Pat Mills, art by Freixas.

Everest, 2 episodes [9 pgs], 2000 AD progs 34-35 (Oct. 1977). Story by Scott Goodall, art by John Cooper.

M.A.C.H. Woman, 4 episodes [24 pgs], 2000 AD progs 36-39 (Oct. to Nov. 1977). Story by Alan Hebden, art by Lozano & Canos.

Death Ray, 3 episodes [17 pgs], 2000 AD progs 40-42 (Nov. to Dec. 1977). Story by Alan Hebden, art by Lozano & Canos.

M.A.C.H. Zero, 4 episodes [22 pgs], 2000 AD progs 43-46 (Dec. 1977 to Jan. 1978). Story by Steve MacManus, art by Ramon Sola.

Return to Sharpe, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 53 (Feb 1978). Story by Roy Preston, art by Montero.

The Dolphin Tapes, 4 episodes [21 pgs], 2000 AD progs 54-57 (Mar. 1978). Story by Steve MacManus, art by Jesus Redondo (pts 1-2) & Montero (pts 3-4).

Swamp Saga, 1 episode [5 pgs], 2000 AD prog 58 (Apr. 1978). Story by Roy Preston, art by John Cooper.

Origins, 2 episodes [8 pgs], 2000 AD progs 59-60 (Apr. 1978). Story by Nick Landau & Roy Preston, art by Lothano.

The Final Encounter, 4 episodes [25 pgs], 2000 AD progs 61-64 (Apr. to May 1978). Story by Pat Mills, art by Montero.

The MACH-Man File, 1 episode [9 pgs], 1978 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special (July 1978). Story by Mike Lake, art by Trevor Goring.

untitled, 1 episode [9 pgs], 1979 2000 AD Annual (Sep. 1978). Story and art uncredited.

The Taxaco Venture, 1 episode [6 pgs], 1979 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special (July 1979). Story by Gary Rice, art by Gary Leach.

M A C H ZERO

Character created by Steve MacManus & Kevin O'Neill
16 episodes: 1978, 1980

This is a follow-up to MACH One, concerning an earlier subject of the Compu-Puncture Hyper-Power process. This subject was deemed a failure and placed in an asylum, but, in the aftermath of John Probe's death, MACH 0 escapes and begins having adventures of his own while also being under the threat of a possible recapture. (Synopsis provided by Chris Matterface.)

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

Cyborg Express, 1 episode [7 pgs], 1978 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special (June 1978). Story by Henry Miller, art by Kevin O'Neill.

Cousin George, 8 episodes [40 pgs], 2000 AD progs 65-72 (June to July 1978). Story by Steve MacManus & Geoffrey Miller, art by Mike Dorey (pts 1-2, 4 & 6-8) and Ramon Sola (pts 3 & 5).

The Suit, 3 episodes [15 pgs], 2000 AD progs 73-75 (July to Aug. 1978). Story by Geoffrey Miller, art by Montero.

The Final Days, 4 episodes [18 pgs], 2000 AD progs 162-165 (Apr. to May 1980). Story by "Ian Rogan" (Steve MacManus), art by Mike Dorey.

MAELSTROM

Creators: Robbie Morrison & Colin MacNeil
8 episodes: 1995

Set in the violent outer space world of the STAR judges, this serial concerned a former judge trying to eke out a life of peace, but who gets pulled back into the confrontations between Earth superpowers in a war of attrition on colony worlds, and with the Klegg empire. Things become more complicated when the original STAR judges, all thought dead, turn up as horribly mutated and vengeful survivors in alien bodies.

Reprinted? This series was collected in issue 17 of 2000 AD Extreme Edition in 2006.

Maelstrom, 8 episodes [64 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #73-80 (Feb. to May 1995). Story by Robbie Morrison, art by Colin MacNeil.

MALONE

Creators: Dan Abnett & Simon Coleby
7 episodes: 2006

Reprinted? This series has not yet been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

Malone, 7 episodes [35 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1500-1506 (Aug. to Sep. 2006). Story by "Cal Hamilton" (Dan Abnett), art by Simon Coleby.

MAMBO

Creator: Dave Hine
25 episodes: 1994-96

A fair series marked by Hine's interesting computer-painted backgrounds, which started with two stories dealing with weird police, colonial corruption and alien messiahs before going down the dull road of cyberspace cliche. It's not bad material, but it never really explored the promise it started with, and seems to have been cancelled before many of its threads could be realized. It might also be suggested that the debut probably misfired, spending all eight episodes explaining the complex backstory.

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

The New Flesh, 8 episodes [48 pgs], 2000 AD progs 889-896 (May to July 1994). Story and art by Dave Hine.

Fleshworld, 8 episodes [48 pgs], 2000 AD progs 940-947 (May to July 1995). Story and art by Hine.

Fleshworks, 9 episodes [54 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1014-1023 (Oct. to Dec. 1996). Story and art by Dave Hine.

MANIAC 5

Creators: Mark Millar & Steve Yeowell
19 episodes: 1993-95

The 2000 AD Summer Offensive, which is detailed in the Big Dave entry, was preluded by the debut of Maniac 5, a series set in the near future about an unstoppable war droid under the power of an insane controller, in the 1993 Sci-Fi Special. Maniac 5's immunity to any sort of weapon not held by alien beasties is a little boring.

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

War Journal, 1 episode [? pgs], 1993 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special (June 1993). Story by Mark Millar, art by David Hine & Dondie Cox.

Maniac Five, 8 episodes [48 pgs], 2000 AD progs 842-849 (July to Aug. 1993). Story by Millar, art by Steve Yeowell & Gina Hart

Maniac 6 Prologue, 1 episode [? pgs], 2000 AD Winter Special 5 (Nov. 1993). Story by Millar, art by Richard Elson.

Funeral for a Friend, 1 episode [? pgs], 2000 AD Winter Special 6 (Nov. 1994). Story by Alan McKenzie, art by Rob McCallum.

Maniac Six, 8 episodes [48 pgs], 2000 AD progs 956-963 (Sep. to Oct. 1995). Story by Millar, art by Yeowell & Mike Hadley.

MARAUDER

Creators: Robbie Morrison & Richard Elson
4+ episodes: 2008-present

Reprinted? This series has not yet been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

Marauder, 4+ episodes from 2000 AD "Prog 2009" and progs 1617-- (Dec. 2008). Story by Robbie Morrison, art by Richard Elson. (Episode one double-length.)

The characters in this series were first seen in a Judge Dredd one-off by Morrison and Elson called "Word of the Law" from Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #74 (Feb. 2001).

MAX NORMAL

Character created by John Wagner & Mike McMahon
4 episodes: 1980-83

Max Normal is a hip, swingin' man about the Mega-City who dresses in antique 20th -Century city businessmen's clothes and who found work for several years as Judge Dredd's principal informant. After a handful of cameo appearances in Dredd and four single-part episodes which appeared in Dredd Annuals, the character was retired. Twice afterwards, however, he was drawn out of seclusion by vengeful criminals to lure Dredd into traps - see "Pinboing Replay" in prog 490 and "The Art of Geomancy" in progs 762-766.

Reprinted? Occasional episodes with Max Normal have been reprinted, but for the most part, running across an episode with the character remains pretty haphazard. I'd say he's due for an Extreme Edition, myself!

Mugger's Moon, 1 episode [11 pgs], Judge Dredd Annual 1981 (Sep. 1980). Story by Alan Grant, art by Jose Casanovas.

Droid Fight, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Annual 1982 (Sep. 1981). Story by Kelvin Gosnell, art by Jose Casanovas.

Max Normal, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Annual 1983 (Sep. 1982). Story by Alan Grant, art by Jose Casanovas.

The Max Factor, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Annual 1984 (Sep. 1983). Story by John Wagner & Alan Grant, art by Jose Casanovas.

MAZE DUMOIR

Creators: Alan Hebden & Ian Gibson
2 episodes: 1984

This fun little two-parter about a protected witness who's a lot more than she seems to be was the first 2000 AD series, albeit a short one, with a female lead. It seems to have been designed as a pilot for a longer run that never materialized, which is probably a shame.

Reprinted? This story showed up as a badly-colored backup in the American Halo Jones comic. In May 2008, it was dusted off for 2000 AD Extreme Edition # 29.

The Amazing Maze Dumoir, 2 episodes [12 pgs], 2000 AD progs 368-369 (May 1984). Story by Alan Hebden, art by Ian Gibson.

MAZEWORLD

Creators: Alan Grant & Arthur Ranson
30 episodes: 1996, 1998-99

In the 1980s, Alan Grant helped lead the charge for creator's rights in British comics, allegedly killing Johnny Alpha to make his points. Years later, he finally offered a new creation to 2000 AD, one that the company does not own. As with anything drawn by Ranson, it's beautiful to look at, but the strange dark fantasy set in another dimension, or maybe in the brain-damaged mind of a murderer, really isn't my favorite. It certainly found its fans, though, and returned for a third and final book in 1999.

Reprinted? The original run was reprinted in a two-part collection by Fleetway/Quality in the late 1990s.

The Hanged Man, 10 episodes [60 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1014-1023 (Oct. to Dec. 1996). Story by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson.

The Dark Man, 10 episodes [60 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1101-1110 (July to Sept. 1998). Story by Grant, art by Ranson.

The Hell Maze, 10 episodes [60 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1151-1160 (July to Sept. 1999). Story by Grant, art by Ranson.

MEAN ARENA series one

Creators: Tom Tully & John Richardson
72 episodes: 1980-82

Writer Tom Tully specialized in strips that continued for an incredibly long time before finding a climax and yet stayed popular with readers who enjoyed seeing it unfold. He was also a good hand at the "future sports" genre which 2000 AD had been featuring since prog one. Mean Arena was one of the longest-running strips of its day, with several shorter stories ("matches") appearing across interconnected arcs, with the players moving from one match to another. Unsurprisingly, its strongest elements are the subplots. The game itself is silly, and many of the Slayers' opposing teams are too lame for words. Mother Vlad's Vampires, who dress like bats and shriek, don't even manage camp charm. On the other hand, the other storylines, dealing with the sponsorship of plastics firm Kosi-Flex, a possible traitor named Brazen, our hero Matt Tallon's weird visions, the death of his brother, another Mean Arena star, and his android bodyguard (assigned after an attempt on his life), who looks like a nine-year old boy, all get unexpectedly complex. (Note: It's not like Mean Arena is the sort of strip to generate lots of fan speculation, but it's thought likely that "A. Ridgway" is possibly still Tully writing under a pseudonym.)

Reprinted? The American Bad Company comic found room for many of these episodes as backups, but a complete reprinting is available in Extreme Edition # 26-28 (2007-08). Episodes 1-25 are in the first edition, followed by the next four stories in the second, and the last three stories in the third.
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Tallon, 9 episodes [36 pgs], 2000 AD progs 178-180 & 182-187 (Sep. to Nov. 1980). Story by Tom Tully, art by John Richardson.

The Southampton Sharks, 10 episodes [40 pgs], 2000 AD progs 191-194 & 197-202 (Dec. 1980 to Mar. 1981). Story by Tom Tully, art by John Richardson (pts 1-6 & 9), Steve Dillon (pts 7-8), Johnny Johnson (pt 10).

The Jensens, 6 episodes [24 pgs], 2000 AD progs 218-223 (June to Aug. 1981). Story by Tom Tully, art by Steve Dillon.

The Penzance Riggers, 4 episodes [16 pgs], 2000 AD progs 226-229 (Aug. to Sep. 1981). Story by Tom Tully, art by Eric Bradbury.

The Salford Slicers, 5 episodes [20 pgs], 2000 AD progs 234-238 (Oct. to Nov. 1981). Story by Tom Tully, art by Mike White, Eric Bradbury.

The Edinburgh Executioners, 8 episodes [32 pgs], 2000 AD progs 239-244 & 246-247 (Nov. 1981 to Jan. 1982). Story by Tom Tully, art by Eric Bradbury (pts 1-2) & Mike White (pts 3-8).

The Oxford Invaders, 9 episodes [36 pgs], 2000 AD progs 248-251, 253-255 & 258-259 (Jan. to Apr. 1982). Story by A. Ridgway, art by Mike White.

The Allerton Ants, 7 episodes [28 pgs], 2000 AD progs 261-267 (Apr. to June 1982). Story by A. Ridgway, art by Mike White.

Mother Vlad's Vampires, 11 episodes [44 pgs], 2000 AD progs 268-277 & 279 (June to Aug. 1982). Story by A. Ridgway, art by Mike White.

The Video Game, 3 episodes [12 pgs], 2000 AD progs 280-282 (Sep. 1982). Story by A. Ridgway, art by Jim Eldridge (pt 1), Mike White (pts 2-3).

MEAN ARENA series two

Creators: Alan McKenzie & Anthony Williams
12 episodes: 1993

For reasons not made entirely clear, criminals accused of any crime end up in a stadium where they fight garishly-powered and nicknamed toughs. Other than some interesting comments about the media's treatment of criminals, there's not a lot to this story. The art, however, is up to Williams' high standard.

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

Mean Arena, 12 episodes [60 pgs], progs 852-863 (Sep. to Nov. 1993). Story by Alan McKenzie, art by Anthony Williams.

MEAN MACHINE

Character created by John Wagner & Mike McMahon
31 episodes: 1981-82, 1991, 1994-96, 2000-2001, 2004

One of Dredd's most popular returning foes, Mean Machine Angel was one of the nasty Angel Gang - a crowd of outlaws in the Cursed Earth who made life hell for muties and anyone fool enough tíventure too far afield from Texas City. Pa Angel and his sons Junior, Mean and Link were introduced in "The Judge Child," wherein Dredd killed them all. (A fifth Angel, Fink, was introduced shortly afterwards.) Mean, a giant man with a huge metal claw and a dial on his head which regulates both his temper and the power of his head-butting, was later resurrected by the Judge Child. Despite spending the bulk of the last twenty years in psycho-cubes and undergoing various lobotomies, hypnotherapies and surgical implants to curb his psychotic anti-social ways, Mean Machine remains an ornery, upitty cuss with an intense hatred of Dredd. Most recently, Mean escaped and, rather than antagonize the judges any longer, made his way out of the city to roam the Cursed Earth.

Reprinted? As with Max Normal above, many of Mean Machine's appearances have been reprinted, but not definitively.

The Mean Machine Goes to Town, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Annual 1982 (Sep. 1981). Story by Alan Grant, art by Robin Smith.

The Mean Machine Gets Married!, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Annual 1983 (Sep. 1982). Story by Alan Grant, art by Robin Smith.

Travels With Muh Shrink, 7 episodes [36 pgs], progs 730-736 (May to June 1991). Story by John Wagner, art by Richard Elson.

Son of Mean Machine, 10 episodes [60 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #63-72 (Sep. 1994 to Feb. 1995). Story by John Wagner, art by Carl Critchlow.

Visiting Time, 1 episode [10 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #82 (June 1995). Story by John Wagner, art by John Hicklenton.

Psycho Analysis, 1 episode [6 pgs], 1995 Sci-Fi Special (July 1995). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Rob McCallum.

Mean Streets, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd 1996 Mega-Special (July 1996). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Jim Murray.

Close Encounters of the Mean Kind, 1 episode [? pgs], 1996 Sci-Fi Special (July 1996). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Anthony Williams.

Born Mean, 1 episode [10 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #69 (Sep. 2000). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Kevin Walker.

The Geek, 1 episode [10 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #74 (Feb. 2001). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Paul Marshall & Len Townsend.

Support Yore Local Bastich, 1 episode [10 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #75 (Mar. 2001). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Wayne Reynolds.

The Last Vidshow, 1 episode [10 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #78 (June 2001). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Patrick Goddard & Dylan Teague.

Butt Me Deadly, 1 episode [10 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #79 (July 2001). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Patrick Goddard & Dylan Teague.

Angel Heart, 3 episodes [24 pgs], Meg 218-220 (May to June 2004). Story by John Wagner, art by David Millgate.

Mean Machine Angel is most commonly seen as a guest antagonist in various Judge Dredd episodes, starting in the 1981 epic "The Judge Child." See progs 156-181, 281-288, 377-383, 450, 965-966, 1084 and 1207-1208, Megazine vol.3 #2-7 and Batman/Judge Dredd: Judgement on Gotham.

MEAN TEAM

Creators: Alan Grant & Massimo Belardinelli
32 episodes: 1985, 1987, 1989

Mean Team started stupid and went downhill. The actual "violent future sport" story was an outdated cliche when it debuted in 1985, so they reformulated it into a weirdo fantasy that gave Belardinelli the chance to draw more weird beasties. "Return" killed off the group after an overlong, cliche-ridden script and unbelievably hackneyed climax, but they brought back the panther two years later. "Return" and "Survivor" are contenders for the "worst individual story" sweepstakes.

Reprinted? The Best of 2000 AD found room for the original series across # 79-80. Extreme Edition # 25 (2007) reprinted "Deathbowl" and "Return."

Deathbowl, 11 episodes [53 pgs], progs 437-447 (Sept. to Dec. 1985). Story by "The Beast" (Alan Grant & John Wagner), art by Massimo Belardinelli.

Return, 15 episodes [59 pgs], progs 525-531, 533-535 and 537-541 (June to Sept. 1987). Story by Alan Hebden, art by Belardinelli.

Survivor, 6 episodes [30 pgs], progs 639-644 (Aug. to Sept. 1989). Story by Hilary Robinson, art by Ron Smith.

MEDIVAC 318

Creators: Hilary Robinson & Nigel Dobbyn
25 episodes: 1989-90

The best of Robinson's series for the weekly, Medivac 318 is a very enjoyable and often thrilling look at a medical space station in a war zone. If she's guilty of anything, it's giving us too many three-dimensional characters in such a short period for us to get used to them. Dobbyn's art isn't at the peaks he'd manage later, but his designs, particularly for the insectoid Jenarit, are very good.

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

Medivac 318, 12 episodes [72 pgs], progs 619-624 and 635-640 (Mar. to Aug. 1989). Story by Hilary Robinson, art by Nigel Dobbyn.

Medivac Despatches: Chemical Warfare, 1 episode [? pgs], Winter Special 2 (Dec. 1989). Story by Robinson, art by Massimo Belardinelli.

Arcturus, 12 episodes [60 pgs], progs 683-694 (June to Sept. 1990). Story by Robinson, art by Dobbyn.

MEGA-CITY NOIR

anthology series
2 episodes: 2004

An anthology umbrella designed by Simon Spurrier, this was quickly sidelined in favor of the very popular Simping Detective series. Two episodes have seen print under this banner.

Reprinted? This series has not been reprinted. You'll need the original Megs.

Gumshoe, Meg 220. *See THE SIMPING DETECTIVE.

Goons, Goons, Goons..., 1 episode [6 pgs], Meg 226 (12/04). Story by Simon Spurrier, art by Esteve Polls & Cliff Robinson.

MELTDOWN MAN

Creators: Alan Hebden & Massimo Belardinelli
50 episodes: 1980-81

Alan Hebden scripted some extremely good comics in the late 1970s and early 1980s, including Major Eazy for Battle, Mind Wars for Starlord and The Angry Planet for Tornado. While he did not work often for the Galaxy's Greatest, he did create this really intricate and thrill-powered story. An often overlooked series in which an ex-SAS officer named Nick Stone is blasted into a possible future after a nuclear explosion, Meltdown Man actually holds the 2000 AD record for longest consecutive run by a writer and artist team with fifty unbroken episodes. In this ugly future, Stone finds a few pockets of lazy, bored humans who have created races of anthropomorphic animal-people called "Yujees" to do all the work. Stone is allied with a catgirl called Liana in his battle with the corrupt human Leeshar. It's easy to dismiss this series as unimportant, as it spent a quarter of a century languishing unreprinted and somehow lacks the "kick" that other series of the period have, but a any run of eight episodes reveals how interesting the serial's structure is, with parallel-running plotlines and a host of recurring characters who show up after weeks away. Also, this is not a series of short adventures masquerading as one big, long plotline - Hebden really crafted a 50-week, 220-page serial adventure. Definitely worth a reappraisal.

Reprinted? This series was collected in issues 11 and 12 of 2000 AD Extreme Edition in 2005.

Meltdown Man, 50 episodes [221 pgs], 2000 AD progs 178-227 (Sep. 1980 to Aug. 1981). Story by Alan Hebden, art by Massimo Belardinelli.

MERCY HEIGHTS

Creators: John Tomlinson & Kevin Walker
31 episodes: 1997-99

John Tomlinson had been part of 2000 AD's editorial staff in the mid-1990s and later offered this well-intentioned, but unremarkable, series about a space hospital. Perhaps there was too much happening on the page for the series to be really successful, but all it is truly remembered for today is giving Tor Cyan a first appearance. Cyan later got his own series, which then tied into Rogue Trooper, and a continuity knot like that is bound to make readers forget about Mercy Heights.

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

Mercy Heights, 15 episodes [91 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1033-1047. (Mar. to June 1997). Story by John Tomlinson, art by Kevin Walker, Andrew Currie & Alan Craddock.

Dead of Winter, 1 episode [10 pgs], 2000 AD prog 1124 (Dec. 1998). Story by Tomlinson, art by Neil Googe & Alan Craddock.

Book II, 15 episodes [91 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1133-1137 and 1139-1148 (Feb. to June 1999). Story by Tomlinson, art by Trevor Hairsine, Lee Sullivan, Neil Googe & Chris Blythe.

METALZOIC

Creators: Pat Mills & Kevin O'Neill
10 episodes: 1986

This is a black & white reprint of the graphic novel which was originally published in color by DC Comics. It concerns robot evolution thousands of years in the future and is a showcase for some of O'Neill's very best work.

Metalzoic, 10 episodes [64 pgs], 2000 AD progs 483-492 (Aug. to Oct. 1986). Story by Pat Mills, art by Kevin O'Neill.

MIDDENFACE McNULTY / YOUNG MIDDENFACE

Character created by John Wagner, Alan Grant & Carlos Ezquerra
31 episodes: 1991-92, 2001-2006

Middenface McNulty first appeared in the 1980 Strontium Dog story "Portrait of a Mutant" and became a recurring character, one of a handful of "good" bounty hunters among those toughs and roughnecks who made up the Search/Destroy Agency. As that series drew to its close, his co-creator Alan Grant gave him a one-off series in the pages of the Judge Dredd Megazine. Following this, McNulty made a few appearances in Peter Hogan's Strontium Dogs series of the mid-90s, but he has not returned to the revived and ongoing adventures of Johnny Alpha.

While 2000 AD continues these adventures of Alpha and Wulf, Alan Grant has quietly been putting together a remarkable backstory for the horrible, ghetto-bound future of the Strontium Dog universe in the recurring Megazine series entitled Young Middenface. The series begins with Middenface as a pre-teen ruffian tossing rocks at military policemen and scampering away, but the stakes get higher as he gets a little older and Scotland vows to rid its land of mutations. "Killoden" was as dark and frightening as comics get, a moody exploration of rebellion and hatred against the bigotted and racist normals.

Young Middenface seems to be coming to some conclusion and its subplots tying together. Perhaps a retelling of "Portrait of a Mutant," from McNulty's point of view, is in the offing?

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

Wun Man an' His Dug, 7 episodes [62 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.1 #15-20 (Dec. 1991 to May 1992). Story by Alan Grant & Tony Luke, art by John McRea & Carter. (2 eps in #20).

Grannibal!, 1 episode [10 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #76 (Apr. 2001). Story by Alan Grant, art by Patrick Goddard & Dylan Teague.

Tambo Shanter, 1 episode [10 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.4 #11 (June 2002). Story by Alan Grant, art by Patrick Goddard & Dylan Teague.

A Parcel of Rogues, 3 episodes [24 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.4 #16-18 (Oct. to Dec. 2002). Story by Alan Grant, art by Patrick Goddard & Dylan Teague.

Mutopia, 3 episodes [24 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine 205-207 (May to July 2003). Story by Alan Grant, art by John Ridgway.

Brigadoom, 3 episodes [21 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine 218-220 (May to July 2004). Story by Alan Grant, art by Patrick Goddard & Dylan Teague.

Killoden, 6 episodes [48 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine 224-229 (Oct. 2004 to Mar. 2005). Story by Alan Grant, art by John Ridgway.

Midnapped!, 3 episodes [24 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine 234-236 (July to Sept. 2005). Story by Alan Grant, art by Shaun Thomas.

A Scottish Sojer, 4 episodes [32 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine 240-243 (Jan. to Apr. 2006). Story by Alan Grant, art by Shaun Thomas.

THE MIND OF WOLFIE SMITH

Creators: Tom Tully & Vanyo
58 episodes: 1979-80

When 2000 AD's sister anthology comic, Tornado, was axed after five months, the 2000 AD editors did not have many strong choices from its strips to fold into 2000 AD's lineup, as most of the strips were light adventure series set in Earth's past, and not really suitable for a sci-fi title. Wolfie Smith was one of the few that made the crossover; it is about a kid with ESP and various psychic powers. The Tornado episodes were run-of-the-mill kid's stuff, running away from home and getting involved with dark and mysterious plots on old family estates. It is perhaps best compared to Alexander Key's 1968 novel Escape to Witch Mountain, made into a successful film by Disney in 1975.

At 2000 AD, Wolfie was still in his early teens but seemed like a more mature character. The threats got a little darker, with an ancient evil force under a stone circle in one story and a criminal gang bent on stealing nuclear warheads in another, but The Mind of Wolfie Smith remained the tamest story in any given issue. While by no means a bad strip, it was a weak one in comparison to the others of its day, and few readers shed any tears when the series was finally shelved.

note: Wolfie Smith's episodes were untitled in Tornado and 2000 AD; the ones listed in the guide below, and at the official site, are of my devising and are unofficial.

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

The Stratfield Estate, 11 episodes [50 pgs], Tornado # 1-11 (March to June 1979). Story by Tom Tully, art by Vanyo.

Hostages, 3 episodes [11 pgs], Tornado # 12-14 (June to July 1979). Story by Ken Armstrong, art by Vanyo.

The Great Mystico & Mandrake, 8 episodes [29 pgs], Tornado # 15-22 (June to Aug. 1979). Story by Tom Tully, art by Vanyo.

The Barchester Bank Raid, 1 episode [6 pgs], Tornado Summer Special (July 1979). Story and art uncredited.

untitled, 1 episode [7 pgs], 1980 Tornado Annual (Sep. 1979). Credits unknown.

The Evil of Matthew Hobb, 4 episodes [16 pgs], 2000 AD progs 127-130 (Aug. to Sep. 1979). Story by Tom Tully, art by Ian Gibson.

Night of the Carnivore, 14 episodes [52 pgs], 2000 AD progs 131-134 & 136-145 (Sep. to Dec. 1979). Story by Tom Tully, art by Vanyo (pts 1-12) & Mike White (pts 13-14).

The Bogieman, 15 episodes [62 pgs], 2000 AD progs 162-175 & 177 (Apr. to Sep. 1980). Story by Tom Tully, art by Jesus Redondo (pts 1-14) & "J. Clough" (Mike Dorey) (pt 15).

untitled, 1 episode [8 pgs], 1981 Tornado Annual (Sep. 1980). Credits unknown.

MIND WARS

Creators: Alan Hebden & Jesus Redondo
21 episodes: 1978

Mind Wars has unfairly been forgotten by today's fanbase. Had it appeared in 2000 AD rather than Starlord, it would have been thought of as one of the book's early high points. It's about 17 year-old twins from a frontier planet during an Earth federation war against the Jugla empire, who find themselves on the run from agents of both. There are some completely unexpected twists and turns in this adventure, and some simply gorgeous artwork. If you can find a complete run of Starlord, you won't be disappointed in this!

Reprinted? This series has not been reprinted. You'll need the original Starlords.

Mind Wars, 21 episodes [123 pgs], Starlord # 2-22 (May to Oct. 1978). Story by Alan Hebden, art by Jesus Redondo (pts 1-19 & 21) and Mike White (pt 20), with Ian Gibson (inks, pt 10).

MISSIONARY MAN

Creators: Gordon Rennie & Frank Quitely
74 episodes: 1993-98, 2000-02

This series, about a disgraced Texas City judge called Preacher Cain and his adventures in the Cursed Earth and the Big Sleazy, was a semi-regular in the Dredd Megazine, presenting several short stories beginning in that mag's second volume. In 1998, the Meg was temporarily reformatted and many of its pages given over to reprints to cut costs. Like Anderson: Psi Division and Devlin Waugh, this series moved to 2000 AD for a three-year period before reaching a conclusion back in the Meg when it resumed commissioning new series.

Reprinted? The first eleven episodes were reprinted by Titan in a very handsome collection.

Salvation at the Last Chance Saloon, 1 episode [7 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #29 (May 1993). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Frank Quitely.

A Town Called Intolerance, 1 episode [7 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #30 (June 1993). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Frank Quitely.

Legend of the Unholy Drinker, 1 episode [7 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #43 (Dec. 1993). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Garry Marshall.

Bad Moon Rising, 6 episodes [42 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #50-55 (Mar. to June 1994). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Frank Quitely.

Season of the Witch, 2 episodes [14 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #56-57 (June to July 1994). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Garry Marshall.

Sanctuary, 2 episodes [14 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #58-59 (July 1994). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Sean Longcroft.

The Undertaker Cometh, 1 episode [7 pgs], 1994 Judge Dredd Mega Special #7. Story by Gordon Rennie, art by S.B. Davis.

Treasure of the Sierra Murder, 4 episodes [30 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #63-66 (Sep. to Nov. 1994). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by S.B. Davis.

Medicine Show, 1 episode [7 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #81. Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Jon Beeston.

Night Riders, 2 episodes [14 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.2 #82-83. Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Jamie Grant.

Mississippi Burning, 3 episodes [22 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #1-3. Story by Gordon Rennie, art by S.B. Davis.*

Crusader, 1 episode [8 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #17 (May 1996). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Charlie Gillespie.

The Big Sleazy, 3 episodes [29 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #18-20 (June to Aug. 1996). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by S.B. Davis.

Night of the Hunter, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #26 (Feb. 1997). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by S.B. Davis.

Mortal Combat, 1 episode [6 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #27 (Mar. 1997). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Marc Wigmore.

Juggernaut, 1 episode [7 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #34 (Oct. 1997). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Henry Flint.

The Shootist, 2 episodes [14 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #36-37 (Dec. 1997 to Jan. 1998). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Christian Bravery.

Storm Warnings, 1 episode [7 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #38 (Feb. 1998). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Trevor Hairsine.

Prologue, 1 episode [6 pgs], 2000 AD prog 1091 (Apr. 1998). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by S.B. Davis.

Mardi Gras, 5 episodes [30 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1092-1096 (Apr. to June 1998). Story by Rennie, art by Alex Ronald & Gary Caldwell.

Goin' South, 6 episodes [36 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1118-1123 (Nov. to Dec. 1998). Story by Rennie, art by Ronald & Caldwell.

Apocrypha, 1 episode [10 pgs], 2000 AD prog 1124 (Dec. 1998). Story by Rennie, art by Henry Flint.

The Promised Land, 17 episodes [90 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1174-1188 (Jan. to Apr. 2000). Story by Rennie, art by Ronald & D'Israeli (pts 1-5, 10-11), Trevor Hairsine (pt 6), Colin MacNeil & D'Israeli (pts 7-9), S.B. Davis (pts 12-14), Dean Ormston (pt 15-17). (Episode 1 is double-length, two episodes appear in progs 1175-76.)

Mark of the Beast, 4 episodes [20 pgs], 2000 AD progs 1201-1204 (July to Aug. 2000). Story by Rennie, art by Jesus Redondo & D'Israeli.

Silence, 1 episode [10 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #77 (May 2001). Story by Gordon Rennie, art by Wayne Reynolds.

Place of the Dead, 5 episodes [46 pgs], Judge Dredd Megazine vol.4 #9-13 (Apr. to Aug. 2002). Story by Rennie, art by John Ridgway.

*Missionary Man also appeared in Harke & Burr: "Satanic Farces" in Judge Dredd Megazine vol.3 #4-7

MOON RUNNERS

Creators: Alan McKenzie, Steve Parkhouse & Massimo Belardinelli
22 episodes: 1988-90

Boardroom intrigue, space adventure and lots of women in slinky leather should have added up to something bigger than this. Moon Runners is a mostly dull story of space truckers and the corporate greed and bizarre rituals behind them. Some of the characters, like psychic helmsman Bunkaru, are interesting, and while Belardinelli contributed some good designs (the Spirit class ships are very unique), his art continues down the same tame, risk-free spiral as the last Ace Trucking series. Sadly, this would be his final series.

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs.

Moon Runners, 15 episodes [77 pgs], 2000 AD progs 591-604 and 607 (Sep. to Dec. 1988). Story by Alan McKenzie & Steve Parkhouse, art by Massimo Belardinelli.

Prologue: Out of the Past, 1 episode [8 pgs], 1989 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special (May 1989). Story by "Sydney Falco" (Alan McKenzie), art by Massimo Belardinelli.

Old Acquaintance, 4 episodes [22 pgs], 2000 AD progs 641-644 (Aug. to Sep. 1989). Story by "Sydney Falco" (Alan McKenzie), art by Massimo Belardinelli.

Pirate!, 1 episode [8 pgs], 1990 2000 AD Annual (Oct. 1989). Story by Alan McKenzie, art by Massimo Belardinelli.

The Homecoming, 1991 2000 AD Annual (Sep. 1990). Story by "Sydney Falco" (Alan McKenzie), art by Massimo Belardinelli.

MOTHER EARTH

Creators: Bernie Jaye & Cliff Robinson
6 episodes: 1993-94

Five reasons, not just to dislike but to loathe this series: 1. The title character is confidently indestructible. There is absolutely nothing whatsoever which can harm her in any way, and so there is no sense of danger here, and where there is no danger, there is no thrill. 2. Since she cannot be harmed, audience identification is shifted onto three normal teens who have been kidnapped and ordered to assist her, and who will never return home. 3. As if we had no reason whatever to sympathize with this character, Bernie Jaye makes her even more hideous by taking sneering "joy" in her work, which is basically murder and kidnapping. 4. The lead character has come back in time to save the planet by murdering anyone whom the computer has identified as responsible for ecological plight. Now the time machine could have simply brought her back to before the toxic waste was spilled or the corporate plunderers rejigged some laws in their favor, but instead it has brought her to a point after the damage is already done, so Mother Earth gleefully kills the polluters after they've already fucked the planet, when her job was actually to save it. 5. The whole series is damned by the same thing which worked against Dead Meat: extremism does not make for interesting characters. Mother Earth's only motive is to brutally murder anyone who disagrees with her. In fact, only one thing prevents this being the worst strip in all of 2000 AD: Cliff Robinson's artwork isn't bad.

Reprinted? This series has never been reprinted. You'll need the original progs. Well, actually. you can safely go without them.

Mother Earth, 6 episodes, 2000 AD progs 867-872 (Dec. 1993 to Jan. 1994). Story by Bernie Jaye, art by Cliff Robinson & Dondie Cox.


Continue to part twelve...
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